Pat Simon

German singer Pat Simon released some great pop songs for the Vogue label in the mid-1960s before becoming a familiar face on the Schlager scene.

She was born on 31 August 1949 in Hamburg, to Hans-Arno Simon, who became a popular singer in the 1950s.

After studying business and interpreting, Pat took singing and acting classes and was offered a recording contract with the Vogue label. Her first single, the beat-tastic Hold tight, sung in heavily accented English, was issued in 1966 but failed to chart. Both sides were versions of UK hits by beat band Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich.

For the follow up she recorded a version of a little-known Italian song, Panna cioccolato e fragola by Leo Sardo, as Komplimente, and scored a top 40 hit.

Alles Rederei was released in early 1967 but failed to build on her previous modest success. Its B-side, Small town, has become something of a favourite with aficionados of German girls of the 1960s. It laments the town she lives in for being dull (“Nightclubs? There aren't any... neon lights don't shine here... town without Beatles shows”) but she's found love, so she stays.

The follow up, Deine Liebe kommt von Herzen, a cover of Swiss singer Arlette Zola’s Deux garçons pour une fille, also flopped.

Her final single for Vogue, the chirpy Unser Glück began im Taxi, issued in late 1967, hinted at the musical direction she would take – in 1968, she switched labels to Metronome, abandoning her beat sound for Schlager.

The move proved successful, at least initially. She appeared in the 1969 Deutsche Schlager-Wettbewerb singing Ein Glück, daß man das Glück nicht kaufen kann (in a dreadfully mumsy green trouser suit) and finished fourth. The song gave her her biggest – and last – hit, reaching number 22 in August 1969.

The follow up, Ja, am Zucker-Zuckerhut, failed to chart later that year, and in 1970 she found herself back at the Schlager-Wettwerb, this time with Punkt, Punkt, Komma, Strich, which (deservedly) finished a lowly tenth.

She released just three more singles over the next two years before being dropped by Metronome.

She tried for a comeback in 1977 with the so-bad-it's -almost-good disco number George disco tango (Part I), released on the Atlantic label, which she sang in English.

With thanks to Jens Keller for additional research.

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